What A Last Hand

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dustin7609
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Joined: Sun Jan 29, 2006 4:22 pm

Re: What A Last Hand

Post by dustin7609 » Mon Sep 06, 2010 10:04 am

So it looks like West is a poor defender after all. If South knew this, then yes by all means he should nil. West makes 2 critical errors on this hand. Can you spot them?

At the level of play that I'm used to, South would NEVER nil in this situation, as he'd assume proper defense. Against poor players of course, strategy changes.

bubblegum
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Re: What A Last Hand

Post by bubblegum » Mon Sep 06, 2010 11:58 am

Obviously leading the only low spade out of his hand, the 6 :spade: was just terrible, and the other one isn't so obvious. For starters, he shouldnt have worried of his 5 bid and left me in the lead for as long as possible, therefore forcing me use my cover cards and he could attack the nil by playing his accordingly.

By the way, I really enjoyed your spades blog. It has some great info.

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dustin7609
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Re: What A Last Hand

Post by dustin7609 » Tue Sep 07, 2010 9:04 am

The second error was retaining the :diamond:K. He has to keep you on lead, as his only viable way to set South is clearly in the spade suit (clearly there is no set in clubs or diamonds and hearts looks like a long shot). West has to play in such a way to keep North on lead as much as possible, and hope he can ruff high at some point. By retaining the KD, he has endplayed himself (An endplay is when you force the opponents to give up a trick by forcing a particular opponent on lead. Another type of endplay occurs when you force the nil cover on lead which causes him to set his partner. West's best play is to get rid of as many entries as he can, in order to exit into the North hand. In this case, West has endplayed himself into covering South).

Here is the critical endplay position of your hand here:

..................North
..................:spade: KQ43
..................:heart: KQ
..................:club: --
..................:diamond: J97
West..............................East
:spade: AJ6............................:spade: 75
:heart: A98...........................:heart: J76
:club: K..............................:club: --
:diamond: Q4.............................:diamond: 853
...................South
...................:spade: 1098
...................:heart: 10432
...................:club: Q
...................:diamond: 2

North just led the :diamond:A and this time West discards his :diamond:K. North has no good options now as he is endplayed. With a :diamond: continuation (his best choice), West will over take and fire back the :diamond:4 putting North back on lead (continuing the endplay). If North continues with another :diamond:, West will trump with the :spade:J, and lead the :heart:9. North cannot exit safely and must set his partner. This is a simple nil set endplay.

Some might say, how can West jeopardize East's :diamond: holding by discarding the :diamond:K? Simple, West must deduce the only chance of a set lies in the :spade: suit. That being the case, he will need to do 2 things to accomplish this: 1) get rid of a high :spade: in which case he'll need North on lead. 2) he will need North on lead when spades are led.

Just as a quick side comment -- here is a more standard type of endplay. It is the exact same concept, forcing an opponent on lead to accomplish your goal (either winning an extra trick as in this case, or setting a nil as above).

..................North
..................:spade: xx
..................:heart: xx
..................:club: --
..................:diamond: --
West..............................East
:spade: Kx.............................:spade: xx
:heart: Kx............................:heart: Jx
:club: --.............................:club: --
:diamond: --..............................:diamond: --
...................South
...................:spade: Ax
...................:heart: AQ
...................:club: --
...................:diamond: --

With South on lead, he simply leads the :spade:A, then a small :spade:. West has been stripped of the other suits and must play into South's :heart: tenace. Note that a simple :heart: finesse will not succeed. Also note it matters not who holds the :heart:K. A finesse is a 50/50 proposition whereas the endplay is 100%.

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